Beryl Thyer Memorial Africa Trust: supporting African children that suffer from Burkitt lymphoma cancer

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Archive for February, 2013

World Child Cancer Day 2013; Dr Francine’s Report from Mbingo Baptist Hospital

We are happy to announce that our WCCD celebration was a big success here in Mbingo Baptist Hospital. We celebrated the day together with parents, survivors, and colleagues from other health facilities.

T Shirts were printed for the survivors, and the message on them was ‘cancer is real and cancer can be treated’, and on the back of the T shirt was printed ‘I am a survivor’.

The posters of the WCCD – modified for our local use – were posted all around the hospital premises and at other health facilities.

We started the celebration on the 14th February with a powerpoint presentation. There were 600 in our audience! They heard about the different early signs of childhood cancer, and we taught the audience how to identify the warning signs.

Then on the 15th in each of our hospitals, we started the day in chapel by explaining the aims of this international day about child cancer. We presented our survivors as a testimony to the fact that “cancer is real and can be treated”. One of our long term survivors showed up with her newborn baby! We explained the early warning signs of the most common childhood cancers in Cameroon to colleagues of our hospital, in addition we also gave them the name of  the different hospitals where childhood cancer is treated.

Here is a good story! Two months ago, whilst consulting in the hospital, an old man came up to me and said ‘Doctor, I know you from BBH; you treated my grand-daughter’. He said she had cancer in her abdomen in 2003, when she was 6, and that she is well. I invited him and the child – now 16 years old – to come to our WCCD celebration. Her name is Naimatou; I could not recognise her for she is now so tall!

Dr Francine Kouya.

Mbingo Baptist Hospital.

A group of survivors with Dr Francine and Nurse Comfort

A group of survivors with Dr Francine and Nurse Comfort

Naimatou, a longterm survivor

Naimatou, a longterm survivor

World Child Cancer Day 2013; Nurse Glenn’s Report from Banso Baptist Hospital

We are happy to announce that our WCCD celebration was a big success here in Banso. We celebrated the day together with 3 parents, 5 survivors, and colleagues from the Catholic hospital, Shisong, and the local District Health Office.

The Chief of Bureau for Kumbo West Health District was very helpful in sharing our posters with all the chiefs of the various government health centres in Kumbo West Health District. Our colleagues from Shisong, with the assistance of the Matron and the full commitment of Mr. Shey Godfred, printed and displayed posters around their hospital, explained the early warning signs of child cancer to patients at the OPD, and also to patients and carers on their Children’s ward.

Here at BBH, we started the day in chapel with ‘awareness creation’, we presented our survivors as a testimony to the fact that “cancer can be treated”. Sister Vera explained the early warning signs of the most common childhood cancers in Cameroon to colleagues of our hospital. After chapel, we gave a talk to patients and carers at the Out Patients Department. We also posted the WCCD posters all around the hospital.

Later in the day, we had a one-hour panel discussion on the most popular radio station in Kumbo (courtesy of the Matron of Shisong – and at no charge). Our panel comprised of 3 nurses from BBH, 3 parents, 1colleague from Shisong, and one survivor. We explained the purpose of the day, explained the early warning signs, the importance of early diagnosis, and urged the public to be watchful. Our parents and our survivor all shared their experiences on air.

We crowned the day with a fellowship meal with parents and survivors, (which was cooked for us by a colleague on children’s ward).

We really enjoyed collaboration from the Catholic Hospital, and the District Health Service. We are confident that our sensitization went far and wide.

Best regards.
Glenn Mbah,
Reaearch Assistant Nurse
Banso Baptist Hospital

Hello from Richard and David

Richard, left; David, right.

Hello!

We’re Richard and David, Peter McCormick’s sons.

We are relatively new trustees of the charity and we have been tasked with creating and updating this website.

We have put together a simple table outlining the costs for the analysis and treatment of a child with Burkitt Lymphoma in the Cameroonian hospitals where BTMAT operates. We hope that this will help you see what a genuine impact every donation we receive can make.

Item

Cost

Blood tests £5.50
Malaria Film £1.25
Stool & Urine Sample Analysis £3.00
Ultrasound Scans £11.00
Bed Fees £9.00
Antibiotics £51.00
Antimalarials £2.50
Blood Transfusion £19.25
Pain killers (for Bone Marrow biopsy and Lumbar Puncture) £19.25
Analgesia and Antiemetics £1.25
X-ray (per film) £7.00
Pathology Costs £20.00
Total £150.00

Your support is needed now as much as it ever has been, and these costs show that even a donation of just…

  • £5 could provide four Malaria film tests
  • £10 could cover the cost of keeping a child in a hospital bed
  • £20 could provide blood transfusions or pain killers for a child
  • £50 could provide all the antibiotics a child needs.

In the UK, the cost to treat a child with Burkitt Lymphoma is approximately £30,000 (up to £75,000 if the child is sent to the intensive care unit).

For BTMAT in Cameroon, this cost is just £150. Anything you can give will make a real difference – please donate here.